Edouard Monseau

The Business Melting Pot

Blog Post created by Edouard Monseau on Apr 29, 2016

I’d like to introduce you to a new concept – the business melting pot. Heard about the melting pot? Well, there’s already been so much literature about it that I won’t risk any comment. Now, I’m here to provide you with insights from inside the Silicon Valley. And if the melting pot is one of America’s most-known ideas, in the Silicon Valley, there’s a level of peer pressure and positive interaction that is completely incredible which helps creating what could be called a business pot, a box for ideas where thinking out of the box can actually mean think together – i.e., including other people’s perspectives. Already heard something like “embracing diversity”? That’s quite about it.

 

It’s no surprise that so many people with diverse backgrounds, cultures, or interests are gathering in the world’s most innovative region. Just this afternoon I’ve sat at a bar with an Australian guy working in Switzerland coming to the US to visit his family. He’s used to comparing and adapting to these 3 cultures and his perspectives and theories were honestly fascinating. To summarize his words, people in Switzerland are working in the context of a lifestyle but can quit without worrying about their future while Americans will do whatever they’re told because they would be afraid of losing their jobs. I’m not actually taking part for or against it; I just want to let you feel - because you’ve probably had a feeling reading these lines, which was probably the “Yes! That’s so much what I feel!” or “uh, this guy’s writing anything” – and this is what’s important.

 

At this point, the idea is not to engage for or against what you’re hearing. Take a step back. Everybody (almost) have their reasons for saying something so it’s probably worth considering it for a second. Anyway, it’s only when you’ve fully understood something that you can really agree with it or give the proper counterargument. That means you have to burst the usual superficial conversation crust and look for the insight, the real thought behind the words. This is because you already know how complicated a conversation is. The beauty is, now you’ve understood and/or had second thoughts, you may be more likely to accept at lest part of the message. This faculty to change your reasoning is so important to keep up business in our modern, innovative, and faster-than-ever evolving environment.

 

Now, to actually change the way you think, you need challengers, which I would here call thought leaders. People who create their own truth. Companies who address society’s biggest problems and come up with crime predictive analytics software or other futuristic solutions. So what’s your vision of the truth? Share it, change it, and challenge the others!268340691_1280x944.jpg

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